Relationship between short-term smoking and insulin resistance in asymptomatic young adults


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Kılavuz A. , Çelikhisar H.

Medicine Science, vol.9, no.4, pp.959-962, 2020 (Refereed Journals of Other Institutions)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 9 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.5455/medscience.2020.05.095
  • Title of Journal : Medicine Science
  • Page Numbers: pp.959-962

Abstract

Obesity, sedentary life, advanced age, and smoking are the factors that increase the insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between short-term smoking and insulin resistance in asymptomatic adults without obesity, advanced age, high blood glucose levels and hypertension. In this study we included 240 participants (120 non-smoker, 120 smoker) aged between 18-35 who admitted to internal medicine outpatient clinic from July 2018 to January 2019. Participants’ body mass index, waist-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c levels were measured. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance values were calculated. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to body mass index, age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance values (p >0.05). High density lipoprotein cholesterol level in smokers was found to be statistically significantly lower than non-smokers (p = 0.02). Our study has shown that there is no relationship between short- term smoking and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance develops with increase in smoking.