ISOLATION OF SYMBIOTIC NITROGEN FIXING BACTERIA FROM CYTISUS PYGMAEUS (WILLD) ROOT NODULES AND ANALYSIS OF NODC GENES


Toklu K., Kasap İ., Eren A. E. , Yaşa İ.

INTERNATIONAL A E G E A N SYMPOSIUM on Natural & Medical Sciences-III , İzmir, Turkey, 12 - 13 March 2021, pp.109-116

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Full Text
  • City: İzmir
  • Country: Turkey
  • Page Numbers: pp.109-116

Abstract

Although the researches about Rhizobial species that perform symbiotic nitrogen fixation especially in the roots of legumes grown for agricultural purposes are intensively studied, there are not enough studies about Rhizobial biota of endemic legumes in our country. Rhizobia are Gram negative, soil bacteria which belong to Alphaproteobacteria class of Protobacteria. Soil bacteria live in nodules found in the roots of plants that belong to the Leguminosae family. Rhizobium spp. are able to form a symbiotic relationship with the roots of legumes. This symbiosis is very important because plants are not able to use nitrogen directly, therefore they need nitrogen-fixing bacteria like Rhizobia. These bacteria colonize in a form of nodules in roots and they convert nitrogen to ammonia. Importantly, ammonia formed in the process of nitrogen fixation provides plants organic compounds such as glutamin and ureides. In return, plants provide Rhizobia organic compounds obtained from photosynthesis. This mutualistic relationship applies to all Rhizobium spp. Nod genes in Rhizobia are genes responsible for nodulation. In this study, 7 rhizobial samples were analyzed. The isolation (in YEMA medium) and morphological characterization of symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria from root nodules of Cytisus pygmaeus (Willd), one of our country's endemics, was performed for 7 isolates whose phenotypic characteristics were determined by cultural methods, conventional PCR protocol was applied with primers designed by targeting the NodC gene region. As a result, the NodC gene region was found in 3 isolates. Based on the possibility of discovering new rhizobial species, studies will continue with some additional molecular research.