Is multiple viral infection a predictor of severity in children with acute bronchiolitis?


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YURTSEVEN A. , TURAN C. , Elibol P., ÇİÇEK C. , SAZ E. U.

HONG KONG JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, cilt.26, ss.275-280, 2019 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 26 Konu: 5
  • Basım Tarihi: 2019
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1177/1024907918789279
  • Dergi Adı: HONG KONG JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.275-280

Özet

Background: Acute bronchiolitis is a common cause of pediatric emergency department admissions in children younger than 2. Objectives: The study aimed to compare the outcomes and the severity of bronchiolitis in young children with multiple simultaneous respiratory virus infections to those with single virus infection and no virus identified group. Methods: Patients with moderate and severe bronchiolitis who visited our emergency department between November 2016 and May 2017 had nasopharyngeal swab samples results tested by multiplex polymerase chain reaction were included in the study. Patients' characteristics, clinical severity of illness, and outcome (pediatric emergency department discharge, admission to ward or pediatric intensive care unit) were compared with the detected viral agents. Results: A total of 241 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 7.8 +/- 2.6 months and 147 (61%) were male. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common detected viral agent in 108 (39%) cases followed by human rhinoviruses in 67 (24%). Respiratory syncytial virus was found more frequently in February and March (p = 0.002). Leukocytosis and pneumonia were more likely observed in patients with only human rhinoviruses (+) subjects (p = 0.010 and p = 0.015, respectively). Intensive care hospitalization rate (16%) was higher in patients with multiple viral agents (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Respiratory syncytial virus remains the most common detected viral agent in acute bronchiolitis patients. While the pathogens detected were seasonally different, there was a significant relationship between leukocytosis, bacterial pneumonia, and detected viral agents. The disease was more severe in patients with multiple viral agents.