Effects of mixed or separate feeding with whole barley or triticale on growth performance, gastrointestinal system, nutrient digestibility and blood constituents in turkeys


KONCA Y., Kirkpinar F., Mert S., ATAC C.

REVUE DE MEDECINE VETERINAIRE, vol.163, no.11, pp.522-529, 2012 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 163 Issue: 11
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.cmpb.2016.04.024
  • Title of Journal : REVUE DE MEDECINE VETERINAIRE
  • Page Numbers: pp.522-529

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding with whole barley and triticale (unground) either through a mixed or separate feeding on the growth performance, gastrointestinal system, nutrient digestibility, and blood constituents in turkeys. A total of 150 four-week-old Hybrid female turkey poults randomly allotted in 5 equal groups were fed for 14 weeks with age adapted basal diets (control group), with whole barley or triticale mixed to diets (groups BM and TM, respectively) or given in a separate feeder (groups BS and TS, respectively). Growth parameters (body weights and weight gains) mainly during the last 6 weeks were significantly increased in the TS group and were coupled to a slight improvement of the food efficiency. In parallel, ileal viscosity was significantly depressed in this group and associated with slight increases in digestibility of organic matter and crude fat. Whole barley mixed to the basal diets or given separately has induced no significant effects on growth, intestinal pH and viscosity and nutrient digestibility, but the absolute and relative colon weights were markedly enhanced in birds fed with barley mixed to basal diets. Although plasma concentrations of lipoproteins and cholesterol tended to increase in birds fed with barley or triticale, no significant change was evidenced on blood biochemistry. These results show that barley and particularly triticale may be added separately to the basal ration without negatively impacting growth and digestion performances in turkeys, therefore offering some economical advantages.