A Pilot Study Into the Use of FDG-mNP as an Alternative Approach in Neuroblastoma Cell Hyperthermia


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SUBRAMANİAN M., PEARCE G., Guldu O. K. , TEKİN V., MİASKOWSKİ A., ARAS O., ...Daha Fazla

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, cilt.15, ss.517-525, 2016 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 15 Konu: 6
  • Basım Tarihi: 2016
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1109/tnb.2016.2584543
  • Dergi Adı: IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.517-525

Özet

Herein, we present a pilot study concerning the use of fluorodeoxy glucose conjugated magnetite nanoparticles (FDG-mNP) as a potential agent in magnetic nanoparticle mediated neuroblastoma cancer cell hyperthermia. This approach makes use of the 'Warburg effect', utilizing the fact that cancer cells have a higher metabolic rate than normal cells. FDG-mNP were synthesized, then applied to the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cancer cell line and exposed to an ac magnetic field. 3D Calorimetry was performed on the FDG-mNP compound. Simulations were performed using SEMCAD X software using Thelonious, (an anatomically correct male child model) in order to understand more about the end requirements with respect to cancer cell destruction. We investigated FDG-mNP mediated neuroblastoma cytotoxicity in conjunction with ac magnetic field exposure. Results are presented for 3D FDG-mNP SAR mnp (10.86 +/- 0.99 W/g of particles) using a therapeutic dose of 0.83 mg/mL. Human model simulations suggest that 43 W/kg SAR Theo would be required to obtain 42 degrees C within the centre of a liver tumor (Tumor size, bounding box x = 64, y = 61, z = 65 [mm]), and that the temperature distribution is inhomogeneous within the tumor. Our study suggests that this approach could potentially be used to increase the temperature within cells that would result in cancer cell death due to hyperthermia. Further development of this research will also involve using whole tumors removed from living organisms in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography.