A new technique to analyse threshold-intensities based on time dependent change-points in the ratio of minute ventilation and end-tidal partial pressure of carbon-dioxide production


ÖZKAYA Ö. , BALCI G. A. , As H., YILDIZTEPE E.

RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY & NEUROBIOLOGY, vol.294, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 294
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.resp.2021.103735
  • Title of Journal : RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY & NEUROBIOLOGY
  • Keywords: Change-point detection, Gas exchange, Respiratory, Ventilatory threshold, RESPIRATORY COMPENSATION POINT, GAS-EXCHANGE THRESHOLD, ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD, OXYGEN-UPTAKE, INCREMENTAL EXERCISE, V-SLOPE, LACTATE, MUSCLE, PERFORMANCE, POTASSIUM

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test the utility and effectiveness of an alternative computational approach to threshold-intensities based on time dependent change-points in minute ventilation divided by end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (V-E/PETCO2) to reveal whether respiratory compensation point (RCP) is a third ventilatory threshold, or not. Ten recreationally active young adults and ten well-trained athletes volunteered to take part in this study. Following incremental ramp tests, gas exchange threshold (GET) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) were respectively evaluated by the slopes of VCO2-VO2 and VE-VCO2 using the Innocor system automatically. Respiratory threshold (RT) was analysed based on time dependent change-points in the VE/PETCO2 using binary segmentation algorithm. Additionally, those intersections were analysed independently by two experienced investigators using a visual identification technique in a double-blind design. According to the results, in the recreationally active group, there were the first (GET(1)) and the second (GET(2)) gas exchange thresholds which were identical with the RT1 (139 W; 1.9 L.(-1) of VO2; 1.73 L.(-1) of VCO2; 49.9 L.(-1) of VE versus 139 W; 1.88 L.(-1); 1.7 L.(-1); 49 L.(-)1(,) respectively) and RT2 (186 W; 2.39 L.(-1) of VO2; 2.44 L.(-1) of VCO2; 66 L.(-1) of VE versus 187 W; 2.41 L.(-1); 2.49 L.(-1); 65.7 L.(-1), respectively). However, there were three threshold intensities which were determined by GET1, GET2, and RCP in well-trained athletes. Additionally, RT1, RT2, and RT3 were determined as valid surrogates of the GET1 (194 W; 2.56 L.(-1) of VO2; 1.99 L.-1 of VCO2; 57.5 L.(-1) of VE versus 192 W; 2.61 L.(-1); 1.99 L-1; 57.7 L.(-1), respectively), GET2 (267 W; 3.6 L.(-1) of VO2; 3.29 L.(-1) of VCO2; 94.5 L.(-1) of VE versus 266 W; 3.58 L.(-1); 3.26 L.(-1); 93.4 L.-1, respectively), and RCP (324 W; 4.05 L.(-1) of VO2; 4.13 L.(-1) of VCO2; 124 L.-1 of VE versus 322 W; 4.02 L.(-1); 4.07 L.(-1); 122 L.(-1), respectively) in well-trained athletes. There were high levels of agreements between the power outputs determined by traditional techniques and newly proposed change-points in RT. All markers were strongly correlated (p < 0.001). It was shown that RT technique can provide an accurate threshold determination. Furthermore, the RCP was observed as a third threshold-intensity for well-trained athletes but not for recreationally active young adults.