Disappearance of a GH Secreting Macroadenoma, during Long-term Somatostatin Analogue Administration


OZBEK M., ERDOĞAN M. , AKBAL E., GÖNÜLALAN G.

EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & DIABETES, vol.117, no.7, pp.309-311, 2009 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 117 Issue: 7
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Doi Number: 10.1055/s-0028-1086000
  • Title of Journal : EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & DIABETES
  • Page Numbers: pp.309-311

Abstract

Acromegaly is caused by excessive growth hormone secretion, usually from a pituitary adenoma. Increased mortality rate is reverted to that of the normal Population after decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels to less than 2-2.5 mu g/liter and normal sex- and age-matched controls, respectively, regardless of the treatment employed. The use of somatostatin analogues as primary or adjunctive therapy has been widely applied in the management of acromegaly. A few cases have been reported in the literature, complete shrinkage of a pituitary GH secreting macroadenoma after long-term somatostatin analogue administration. We report a patient in whom long term (60 months) octreotide-L.A.R administration resulted in complete disappearance of a growth hormone secreting pituitary macroadenoma.